THE ECCLESBOURNE SCHOOL

Learning Together For The Future

Music - Key Stage 3

Key Stage 3 Key Stage 4 Key Stage 5

National Curriculum

The Ecclesbourne School follows the National Curriculum

The national curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and Musicians
  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations

Curriculum Intent

The year 7 music curriculum is designed to introduce students to several different music genres and to develop their instrumental skills. The year 8 curriculum builds on this during which students start working in groups more frequently building on skills learnt in year 7, particularly during topics such as reggae and the band project. During year 9, students are able to further develop themselves as well-rounded musicians in preparation for the GCSE music course and wider life skills.

Curriculum Implementation

Filter:

  Term Content
Year 7 Autumn Term 1

Introduction to Singing

  • During this term, students will understand the basics of singing within a choir, focusing on basic harmonies, structures and melodies. Pupils are developing performance skills which are essential for success at KS4 and KS5.
  • Lessons are delivered in a series of workshop choir sessions, learning pieces of increasing difficulty, with all pupils gathered around the piano. Pupils learn each song before the teacher selects which one will be performed for the assessment.
2

Keyboard Skills 1

  • Students understand the Keyboard as an instrument, focus on correct keyboard technique and are able to play a keyboard piece by the end of the topic. Pupils are learning to play a new instrument; this may be something which they choose to specialise in during KS4/5. Pupils work through worksheets which become increasingly more difficult. At the end of the topic, pupils choose which piece they want to perform.
Spring Term 3

Composition 1

  • Students learn about some basic music theory and how to write their own simple melodies. Students will be able to write a simple melody which includes crotchets, minims, quavers and semibreves and covers an octave. Pupils are learning essential skills of music theory which they will not have already had much exposure to. This is critical for success during the examination elements of KS4 and 5. Pupils will learn about the importance of rhythm in music and focus on four simple note lengths as well as understanding pitch and how they are written on the music stave. Pupils also begin to understand composition as a concept, this is one of the essential aspects of the KS4/5 course and arguably one that pupils find the most challenging.
4

Sequencing

  • Students learn about how to use computer software to create music. Specifically focusing on how to use and manipulate samples to create a sequenced composition. As part of the GCSE and A Level courses, all pupils have to compose, many of whom will choose to use computer software to do this.
  • Pupils will learn how to use the software GarageBand through a number of workshops aimed at improving their skills on the software. Pupils will use the software to create a sequenced composition at the end of the topic.
Summer Term 5

Programme Music

  • Students will understand how key composers told stories through music and to compose their own programme music. Pupils will develop their aural recognition and further their understanding of compositional devices and techniques. As part of the GCSE and A Level courses students will be expected to understand how programme music fits into the history of Western Classical Music and analyse examples of programme music. Students will learn about the importance of how programme music can tell a story.
6

Ukulele & Guitar Skills

  • Students learn about the Ukulele and the Guitar. They also understand what chord boxes are and how we use these to decipher chords on these instruments. Students will be able to play a chord progression on one of these instruments.
  • Pupils are learning to play a new instrument which may be the instrument which they choose to specialise in for the performance element of the KS4/5 course. Pupils will spend an equal number of sessions learning about the Ukulele first and then the Guitar. During these sessions they will learn about how to play chords on the instruments, including correct playing technique and style.
  Term Content
Year 8 Autumn Term 1

Keyboard Skills 2

  • Students revisit the Keyboard as an instrument, this time playing with two hands rather than just one. Pupils will be able to perform a piece with two hands.
  • Pupils are learning to play a new instrument; this may be something which they choose to specialise in during KS4/5. Pupils work through worksheets which become increasingly more difficult building on the basic keyboard skills learn in year 7. At the end of the topic, pupils choose which piece they want to perform.
2

Composition 2

  • Students build on their learning from Composition 1 by writing a melody based on a set of chords. This requires extra thought with regards choice of pitches and rhythms. Pupils are learning essential skills of music theory which they will not have already had much exposure to. This is critical for success during the examination elements of KS4 and 5.
  • Pupils also begin to understand composition as a concept, this is one of the essential aspects of the KS4/5 course and arguably one that pupils find the most challenging. Pupils will learn about how to write a melody in response to a set of chords, ensuring that the pitches they choose compliment the accompaniment. Pupils will build up skills each week, learning how to develop a melody.
Spring Term 3

Blues

  • Students understand the genre of music known as Blues. They understand the context of the genre as well as iconic features. Pupils are learning about different genres of music, when it comes to set work analysis at KS4 and 5, an understanding of a wider range of musical genres and styles is essential.
  • Pupils will learn about all the aspects of a Blues piece: chords, walking bassline, improvised melody, blues lyrics. Each lesson will be devoted to each of these elements before pupils put them together in groups to form a completed piece.
4

Film Music

  • Pupils revisit computer based composition, but this time we are asking them to combine the use of samples (from ‘Sequencing’ in Year 7) with some of their own composed ideas. This is done through the medium of Film music.
  • As part of the GCSE and A Level courses, all pupils have to compose, many of whom will choose to use computer software to do this. Students will engage with a number of workshops where they will learn different Film music techniques. Each lesson students will put these techniques into practice with a film clip.
Summer Term 5

Reggae

  • Students understand the Reggae genre of music. They understand the context of the genre as well as iconic musical features. Pupils are learning about different genres of music, when it comes to set work analysis at KS4 and 5, an understanding of a wider range of musical genres and styles is essential.
  • Pupils will learn about the different parts of the Reggae song ‘Three Little Birds’. These include the chords, bassline and riff, as well as the sung melody. Pupils will learn each part separately before putting it together in a group.
6

Guitar Riffs

  • Students will understand more about the Guitar as well as understand how to read TAB notation. Students will use this knowledge to perform a piece by reading the TAB notation. Pupils are developing skills of performance on an instrument as well as learning a new type of notation (Tablature), a good knowledge of all elements of music theory is crucial at KS4 and 5. Pupils will understand about what TAB is and how to read it for the Guitar. Pupils will then learn pieces which get increasingly more difficult before picking the one they are most confident on to perform for an assessment.
  Term Content
Year 9 Autumn Term 1

Indian Classical Music

  • Pupils will understand the context and stylistic features of music from Indian Classical music. Pupils will work together to create a performance of their own Indian Classical Piece of music. Pupils will need a wide range and understanding of music from all genres and time periods for the examination at KS4 and 5. Indian Classical Music is a key genre of music used in the fusion music set works on the GCSE and A Level syllabi. Students will learn about the three main aspects of Indian Classical music: Tala, Drone and the Raga. Students will then use all of these elements to create a structured Indian piece in groups.
2

Kraftwerk

  • Pupils will understand about the context and impact of the band Kraftwerk as well the time period. Pupils will learn to play a Kraftwerk song as a class. Pupils will be learning to perform with a large ensemble as well as understanding further about different genres and time periods of music. All of which are essential for success at KS4 and 5. Pupils will understand about the band Kraftwerk and their impact on Electronic music from the 1970’s to present day. Pupils will learn all of the different sections to one of Kraftwerk’s songs and then perform it as a class.
Spring Term 3

GCSE transition topics

  • In this project, students will be introduced to the key musical elements focused on in both the GCSE and A Level course. They will perform and analyse exerts from GCSE set works to provide a foundation of knowledge ready for year 10.
4

Composition 3

  • In this unit you will improve skills of the software Garageband to create your own song from scratch with no sequencing or samples to help you. Students will need to include their own drum beat, bass line and chords.
Summer Term 5

Band Project

  • Pupils will develop their skills of working within an ensemble by learning to play a set piece and creating their own cover version of a pop song. Ensemble skills are an essential part of the performance aspect of both the KS4 and KS5 courses.
  • Pupils will be introduced to three different choices of songs which they can cover. Pupils will then work in groups to decide on roles and create their own version of their chosen song.
6

My Own Instrument

  • Pupils are able to explore different instruments and develop their skills on one chosen instrument in this topic. Pupils will improve to work towards performing a completed piece. Developing key skills and proficiency on an instrument. Pupils must be able to play an instrument to a good enough standard to be able to succeed in the KS4 and 5 courses. Pupils will be given a choice of instruments to specialise on for this topic. Pupils must make an informed choice so that they can develop their skills on that instrument. Pupils will work through instrument specific booklets which include pieces of increasing difficulty.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

  • Orchestra
  • Swing Band
  • Main Choir
  • Chamber Choir
  • Music Theory Club
  • Brass group
  • Clarinet group

Resources

  • Class sets of djembes, keyboards, samba set and ukuleles
  • Acoustic, electric and bass guitars
  • Several pianos, including two baby grands in both the school’s main hall and new theatre
  • Wide range of percussion including conga drums and drum kits
  • Mac computers
  • Recording equipment
  • Industry standard Nord keyboard

Course Assessment

Grade Assessment Detail
9 Students start with a judgement that runs through their work, with each section reflecting this judgement and conclusion mirroring the introduction. Facts, figures, names and dates are deployed to support arguments and weigh ideas by comparing and evaluating them throughout. Students will support and challenge source material within its context and afterward. They will explicitly refer to utility and evaluate material through discrimination. There may still be areas that are irrelevant but the overall impression is convincing.
8 Students will use specific and detailed knowldge in a clear structure to reach a well-supported judgement. A debate will be created that compares ideas an views with facts, statistics and evaluation. Students may make mistakes but their argument will be well developed with analysis and evaluation throughout. Students will analyse source material in the light of the interpretation it represents and will weigh it in therms of utility and reliability to answer specific questions. Students will routinely exercise discrimination in their choice of quotes though they may not always be entirely convincing.
7 Students’ essays and answers will analyse the information provided, using facts effectively to support arguments and challenge points of view. Students will compare ideas and reach an evaluative conclusion. Students analyse and evaluate source material in its context, using the provenance, to assess utility and reliability but only explain when it helps answer the question. Students may still make mistakes but it is clear they are using the sources carefully and with discrimination.
6 Students will make very few factual errors and organise answers into a proper essay. Students will analyse more than one side of a debate and there will evaluation of ideas in places. Students use sources as evidence rather than as information all the time, comparing and contrasting them with each other and with prior knowledge. Students can link interpretations to what is being studied and explain them fully with some analysis on how to use them.
5 Most of the names, dates and statistics will be accurate and relevant to support a clear argument in paragraphs. Students will cover more than one side of a question, analysing for most of their answer and evaluating in conclusions. Students will routinely evaluate sources for utility by using their provenance before using their content to support answers. When looking at reliability, students may not be entirely relevant. Students will be able to explain why people have different views and how they are created, you can use these views to assess other ideas and questions.
4 Students use paragraphs well and logically with accurate and relevant names, dates and statistics. Students will have an overall argument, and a judgement, that is linked to the question, potentially covering two sides. Students will analyse. Students will evaluate source material using provenance – looking at utility for the most part, quoting them to answer questions. Students will be able to explain why different views exist and will understand how, but may not be able to properly support this yet.
3 Students use paragraphs to make a point and use specific names and dates and facts with some mistakes. Students make mostly valid and correct judgements based on the question that are explained. Students will focus on what sources say to answer a question but will try to use their provenance to work out if they are reliable or useful. Students will try to explain how and why different people have different views of History and will be valid but without analysis.
2 Students use full sentences and paragraphs with names and dates, making some mistakes but not many. Students make valid judgements and reach a conclusion and try to explain themselves. Students will quote from and explain what sources say to answer a question. Students can name and identify different views by different people but can’t explain them yet.
1 Students use full sentences and will use names and dates, though you’ll make mistakes. Students make valid suggestions without detail but link to what is asked, ‘telling the story’. Students may state whether sources are reliable but will still just use them for information. Students understand different groups of people see History in different ways but not how or why.

If you have any questions or queries relating to the Music curriculum please email headofarts@ecclesbourne.derbyshire.sch.uk for more information.