THE ECCLESBOURNE SCHOOL

Learning Together For The Future

Religious Studies - Key Stage 3

Key Stage 3 Key Stage 4 Key Stage 5

Contact: Mr K. James

National Curriculum

The Ecclesbourne School follows the 3 Year National Curriculum

The 1998 Education Act states that:

 Religious Studies should be provided for all registered students except for those withdrawn at the request of their parents. (s 71 SSFA 1998). Education Act (2002) RS must ‘reflect the fact that the religious traditions in Great Britain are, in the main, Christian while taking account of the teaching and practices of the other principal religions represented in Great Britain’. Education Act (1996) School Standards and Framework Act

Religious Studies is a component of the core curriculum, to be taught alongside the National Curriculum in school. Our curriculum incorporates the content of the Derbyshire Agreed Syllabus (2014)

Curriculum Intent

In Religious Studies we aim for all students to develop a love of learning and an interest in exploring cultural diversity. We want students to be reflective about their own beliefs, religious or otherwise, that inform their perspective on life and their interest in, and respect for, other peoples faiths, feelings and values. In addition, students should understand and appreciate the range of different cultures and spirituality within the school and further afield as an essential element of their preparation for life in the modern world.

  • We aim to introduce students to different world faiths.
  • In Years 7 and 8, we employ a thematic approach to religion. This is a link with many of our students experience in Years 5 and 6 so it is developing on what they may already know something of.
  •  In Year 9 we develop students understanding of a ‘block’ approach to religion and Religious Studies. We look at three world religions, Hinduism, the oldest, Judaism, the forerunner to Christianity and then Christianity in the longest term as the main religious tradition of this country.
  •  In Year 9 we also introduce elements of an ethical approach to religions in part to help prepare for GCSE study and beyond.
  • The teaching and assessment strategies used throughout Key Stage 3 help to develop our students’ knowledge and skills which will equip them for GCSE study and beyond.
  • Our curriculum promotes cultural relativism in both content and context which supports other curriculum areas, as well as our own.

 

Curriculum Implementation

 

 

Term

Content

Year 7

Autumn Term

1

  • Students will contemplate the question ‘what is religion.’
  • Students will learn about signs and symbols in both a religious and secular context
  • Students will study religious symbolism including artefacts / clothing / buildings from the different world faiths.
  • Some of the symbols which could be covered include:
    • The image of the Buddha
    • The 5Ks of Sikhism
    • The Gurdwara and the Langar
    • Jewish symbols
    • Church symbolism
  • Students will engage in a visit to one of our local churches – St. Alkmunds.

2

  • Students will begin to study the lives and teachings of different founders of the worlds’ faiths, this could include:
    •  Buddha: the concept of dukkha and the Eightfold Path
    • Jesus: the concepts of crucifixion and resurrection, agape and forgiveness

Spring Term

3

  • Abraham / Moses: the concept of the covenant and monotheism, the ten plagues and the Ten Commandments
  • Muhammad: the Night of Power, the Hijrah and the Five Pillars
  • Guru Nanak: his pilgrimages, the concept of sewa and the ten gurus
  • Origins of Hinduism: the Indus Valley Civilisation

 These teachings will be revisited when studying exemplars of faith and faith in action.

4

  • Exemplars of faith
  • Some of the examples which could be covered include:
    • Martin Luther King Jr
    • Mother Theresa
    • Mahatma Gandhi
    • The Dalai Lama
    • Malala Yousafazai
    • Irena Sendler

Summer Term

5

  • Faith in action. How religious communities show their faith in action.
  • Some of the examples which could be covered include:
    • Food banks
    • Charitable work: e.g. CAFOD, Christian Aid, Muslim Aid
    • Street Pastors
    • Environment

 These themes provide a basis for more in-depth study at GCSE.

6

  • A Humanities cross-curricular study visit to the city of Lincoln.
  • The RS component: the influence of Lincoln Cathedral as a place of worship and community in the past, present and future

 

Term

Content

Year 8

Autumn Term

1

  • Religion and Science (different ways of seeing):
  • Concepts of theism, atheism and agnosticism
  • Literal and non-literal interpretations
  • Religious and cultural creation stories, including the Genesis creation storyBig Bang; evolution
  • Some other ideas which could be covered include:
    • Optical illusions
    • Pascal’s Wager
    • Cosmological Arguments
    • Teleological Arguments

2

  • Mysteries and miracles: different interpretations of
  • Some examples which could be covered include:
    • Premonitions
    • Hypnotic regression
    • Bermuda Triangle
    • Stigmata
    • Reincarnation
    • Healing miracles
    • Lourdes

Spring Term

3

  • Rites of Passage:
  • What are rites of passage, the concept of ‘rite’ and ‘ritual’, both secular and religious rites of passage and why they are important
  • Birth rituals
  • Some examples which could be covered include:
    • Samskaras
    • Brit Milah
    • Baptism and thanksgiving
    • Adhan (Azzan)
    • Naam Karam

 The Christian and Muslim rites of passage are studied in more depth at GCSE.

4

  • Rites of Passage:
  • Initiation ceremonies
  • Some examples which could be covered include:
    • Sacred Thread
    • Bar Mitzvah / Bat Mitzvah
    • Making of a Buddhist monk
    • Confirmation and Believers Baptism
    • Bismillah
    • Amrit

 The Christian and Muslim rites of passage are studied in greater depth at GCSE.

 

Summer Term

5

  • Rites of Passage:
  • The purpose of marriage and vows; arranged marriage; agreed marriage; cohabitation; same-sex marriage
  • Christian wedding ceremony simulation
  • Other religious wedding ceremonies 

All of these concepts are studied in greater depth at GCSE.

 

6

  • Rites of Passage:
  •  Death and the afterlife, beliefs and practices in religion and culture
  • Some examples which could be covered include:
    • Resurrection
    • Reincarnation and rebirth
    • Funeral rites: including cremation and burial
    • Mexican Day of the Dead
    • Buddhist vulture peak

 The Christian and Muslim rites of passage are studied in greater depth in the themes paper at GCSE.

 

 

Term

Content

Year 9

Autumn Term

1

  • Hinduism: An in-depth study of the origins of Hinduism, beliefs, teachings and practices and its influence in the world today
  • The sub-continent of India
  • The concept of God in Hinduism, including Brahman and the Trimurti, and incarnation
  • The caste system
  • Reincarnation and the Hindu Game of Life
  • Puja and the Mandir
  • Diwali

2

  • A visit to a local Swaminarayan Hindu Temple (Mandir)
  • Other themes which could be covered include:
    • The satyagraha of Gandhi
    • Ahimsa and the treatment of animals
    • Marriage
    • Sumitra’s story
    • The Stolen Statue

Spring Term

3

  • Judaism: An in-depth study of the origins of Judaism, beliefs, teachings and practices and its influence in the world today.
  • Belief in God, monotheism and covenant
  • The Torah
  • The Synagogue
  • Kosher/Kashrut food laws
  • Friedrich’s Story

4

  • Judaism including a unit on the Holocaust:
  • Anti-Semitism, prejudice and discrimination
  • Believers responses to the Holocaust
  • Reflections on the Holocaust
  • This unit of work on the Holocaust is taught and learnt through a variety of mediums, including art, film, a visit to the national Holocaust centre and hearing a survivors testimony

Summer Term

5

  • Christianity: An in-depth study of the origins of Christianity, beliefs, teachings and practices and its influence in the world today.
  • Belief in God, the Trinity and monotheism
  • The crucifixion and resurrection
  • Key Christian teachings: the Sermon on the Mount, the Eleventh Commandment, the concepts of agape and forgiveness
  • Parables
  • Miracles

6

  • The Problem of Evil and Suffering
  • The theodicies
  • Other themes which could be covered include:
    • The Reformation
    • Denominations: including sects and cults
  • Included in this unit we have visiting Christian speakers, from different denominations, in to school

The themes in this unit of work are studied in greater depth in the GCSE course.


 

Extra Curricular Activities

  • Various trips; competitions; ‘Make a Difference’ projects.

Course Assessment

Grade Assessment Detail
9 Students demonstrate exceptional knowledge with exceptional understanding and insight into all aspects of religion; describe reason, analyse and explain the significance and impact of beliefs, teachings and practices of any of the world faiths they have been studying; demonstrate superb informed insight in their evaluation and without fail, evaluate a variety of points of view to reach evidenced judgements and conclusions based on an exceptional grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
8 Students demonstrate exceptional knowledge with excellent understanding and insight into all aspects of religion; can describe reason, analyse and explain the significance and impact of beliefs, teachings and practices of any of the world faiths they have been studying; demonstrate excellent and informed insight in their evaluation and evaluate a variety of points of view to reach evidenced judgements and conclusions based on an excellent grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
7 Students demonstrate excellent knowledge with very high levels of understanding and insight into all aspects of religion; can describe reason, analyse and explain the significance and impact of beliefs, teachings and practices of many of the world faiths they have been studying; demonstrate excellent insight in their evaluation and they can evaluate a variety of points of view to reach evidenced judgements and conclusions based on a high level grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
6 Students demonstrate very good knowledge with very competent understanding and insight into different aspects of religion; can describe reason and explain the significance and impact of beliefs, teachings and practices of some of the world faiths they have been studying; ; demonstrate an informed insight in their evaluation and evaluate a variety of points of view to reach judgements and conclusions based on a very good grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
5 Students demonstrate good knowledge with a good understanding of religion; can describe, explain and reason many of the beliefs, teachings and practices of faiths. They show good awareness of the meaning and importance of religion (s) and / or the beliefs studied; demonstrate mostly informed insight in their evaluation and can evaluate a variety of points of view but may not always reach evidenced judgements and conclusions. They show a good grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
4 Students demonstrate sound knowledge with sound understanding of religion; can describe and explain the significance of many of the world religions’ beliefs, teachings and practices of faiths; show sound awareness of the meaning and importance of religion (s) and / or the beliefs studied; demonstrate a sound insight in their evaluation and evaluate a number of points of view to reach judgements and conclusions based on a sound grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
3 Students demonstrate some knowledge with a reasonable understanding of religion; can describe with some reasoning some beliefs, teachings and practices of some faiths; show some awareness of the meaning and importance of religion (s) and / or the beliefs studied; They can sometimes recognise that there are differing viewpoints, even within one issue and their evaluation is a little limited but they can sometimes reach a conclusion based on a partial grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.
2 Students demonstrate limited knowledge with some understanding of religion; can describe with some basic reasoning some beliefs, teachings and practices of some faiths; show limited awareness of the meaning and importance of religion (s) and / or the beliefs studied.; can use some argument but not always supported by any evidence when responding to religious beliefs, morals and ultimate questions; can occasionally recognise that there is more than one side to an issue and they can occasionally demonstrate a judgement or a conclusion based on their basic knowledge of religious belief, issues and questions.
1 Students demonstrate basic knowledge with limited understanding of religion. They can describe but with little reasoning some beliefs, teachings and practices of some faiths; show little or no awareness of the meaning and importance of religion (s) and / or the beliefs studied; use limited argument and it is never reasoned or supported on any religious belief, morals or ultimate questions; fail to recognise that there is a complexity of issues and demonstrate very little if any, informed insight in their evaluation. They may jump to a conclusion with a limited grasp of religious belief, issues and questions.

If you have any questions or queries relating to the Religious Studies curriculum please email headofhumanities@ecclesbourne.derbyshire.sch.uk for more information.