THE ECCLESBOURNE SCHOOL

Learning Together For The Future

English - Key Stage 3

Key Stage 3 Key Stage 4 Key Stage 5

National Curriculum

The Ecclesbourne School follows the 3 Year National Curriculum

The overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. The national curriculum for English aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

Reading

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently through:
    • reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction, including in particular whole books, short stories, poems and plays with a wide coverage of genres, historical periods, forms and authors, including high-quality works from English literature, both pre-1914 and contemporary, including prose, poetry and drama; Shakespeare (2 plays) and seminal world literature
    • choosing and reading books independently for challenge, interest and enjoyment
    • rereading books encountered earlier to increase familiarity with them and provide a basis for making comparisons
  • understand increasingly challenging texts through:
    • learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
    • making inferences and referring to evidence in the text
    • knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension
    • checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense
  • read critically through:
    • knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
    • recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used
    • studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these
    • understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play
    • making critical comparisons across texts
    • studying a range of authors, including at least 2 authors in depth each year

Writing

Pupils should be taught to:

  • write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information through:
    • writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, including: well-structured formal expository and narrative essays; stories, scripts, poetry and other imaginative writing; notes and polished scripts for talks and presentations and a range of other narrative and non-narrative texts, including arguments, and personal and formal letters
    • summarising and organising material, and supporting ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail
    • applying their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
    • drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing
  • plan, draft, edit and proofread through:
    • considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
    • amending the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness
    • paying attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling; applying the spelling patterns and rules set out in English appendix 1 to the key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study for English

Grammar and vocabulary

Pupils should be taught to:

  • consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through:
    • extending and applying the grammatical knowledge set out in English appendix 2 to the key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study to analyse more challenging texts
    • studying the effectiveness and impact of the grammatical features of the texts they read
    • drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
    • knowing and understanding the differences between spoken and written language, including differences associated with formal and informal registers, and between Standard English and other varieties of English
    • using Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech
    • discussing reading, writing and spoken language with precise and confident use of linguistic and literary terminology*

*Teachers should refer to the glossary that accompanies the programmes of study for English for their own information on the range of terms used within the programmes of study as a whole.

Spoken English

Pupils should be taught to:

  • speak confidently and effectively, including through:
    • using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
    • giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point
    • participating in formal debates and structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said
    • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate languages and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact

CURRICULUM INTENT

English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society. A high-quality education in English will teach pupils to speak and write fluently so that they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. Through reading in particular, pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society; pupils, therefore, who do not learn to speak, read and write fluently and confidently are effectively disenfranchised.

 

Curriculum Implementation

 

Term

Content

 

Year 7

Autumn Term

1

Class Novel (studying of the novel will continue into second half term)

To read a whole novel in depth; reading for pleasure and information.

  • To read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • To acquire a wide vocabulary.
  • To make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • To use discussion in order to learn, elaborating and explaining clearly their understanding and ideas.
  • To know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • To study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these.

 

Possible texts:

  • Boy – Roald Dahl
  • Hatchet – Gary Paulsen
  • The Midnight Fox – Betsy Byars
  • Tuck Everlasting – Natalie Babbitt
  • Wonder – R J Palacio

2

Animals Non- Fiction

To introduce students to a wide range of non-fiction forms of writing. Writing to: advise, inform, persuade, appeal, etc. Students must present a charity appeal to the class.

Students will:

  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • be competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations
  • read critically through knowing how language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • summarise and organise material, and support ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
  • plan, draft, edit and proof-read through considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended.

Spring Term

3

a) Theatre trip and review

Students watch a local theatre production and write a review.

Students will:

  • Read critically through understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play
  • write for a wide range of purposes and audiences
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and select the appropriate form
  • amend the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness.
  • pay attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling

b) Spoken English competition

Students learn a poem and read to their class. Successful students will progress further through the school competition.

Students will:

  • improvise, rehearse and perform poetry using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact
  • read a range of high-quality poem, both pre-1914 and contemporary.

4

Poetry

To read a range of poetry in depth; reading for pleasure and information. The poems are mainly modern, for example:

  • Wilderness – Carl Sandburg
  • Not My Best Side – UA Fanthorpe
  • Still I Rise – Maya Angelou
  • In Memory of My Grandfather – Edward Storey
  • Checking Out Me History – John Agard
  • For Meg – Fleur Adcock
  • About His Person – Simon Armitage
  • The Right Word – Imtiaz Dharker

Students will:

  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • recognise a range of poetic conventions and understand how these have been used
  • Write poetry and other imaginative writing
  • draw on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and use these consciously in their writing to achieve particular effects
  • use Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion

Summer Term

5

Journalism

  • To Investigate and critique different sources of news and where we get our news from.
  • To consider how emotive language and bias is used in the media.
  •  To explore the concept and danger of fake news.
  • To analyse newspaper features (language and presentational)
  • To explore how TV news has changed over time.

Students will:

  • participate in structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  •  know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • write for a wide range of purposes and audiences
  • summarise and organise material, and support ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
  • draw on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing
  • consider how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
  • amend the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness
  •  draw on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and use these consciously in their writing to achieve particular effects

6

Shakespeare

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Students will:

  • Select quotations and analyse and respond sensitively to language / writing in different styles
  • Make clear notes on the play
  • Develop note making skills e.g. spider grams / lists etc.
  • Write creatively – verse / blogs
  • have read and appreciated some writing by Shakespeare;
  • have researched key information about Shakespeare
  • have understood and have a secure knowledge of the events, characters and key themes of the play
  • have analysed some of the language and dramatic effects in the play.
  • improvise, rehearse and perform play scripts in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact
  • use Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
  • understand how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play

 

Term

Content

Year 8

Autumn Term

1

Class novel

To read a whole novel in depth; reading for pleasure and information.

  • To read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • To acquire a wide vocabulary.
  • To make inferences and refer to evidence in the text.
  • To use discussion in order to learn, elaborating and explaining clearly their understanding and ideas.
  • To know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • To check their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.
  • To study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these.

 

Possible texts:

  • A Monster Calls – Patrick Ness
  • After Tomorrow – Gillian Cross
  • Holes – Louis Sachar
  • Mortal Engines – Philip Reeve
  • The Giver – Lois Lowry

2

History of Literature

A brief exploration of the history of English Literature from Beowulf to Victorian classics. Students will be introduced to a range of movements in literature and extracts from classic texts.

For example:

  • Beowulf
  • Chaucer
  • Paradise Lost - Milton
  • Shakespeare
  • Romantic literature (William Blake, John Keats)
  • Victorian literature (Charles Dickens)

 

Students will:

  • Read a range will high-quality works from pre-1914 English literature
  • understand increasingly challenging texts through learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • draw on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing

 

Spring Term

3

Gothic

A study of the Gothic genre; students read a range of literature, including 19th century extracts and write their own gothic stories.

Texts/extracts from texts studied:

  • The Red Room – H. G. Wells
  • Dracula – Bram Stoker
  • Frankenstein – Mary Shelley
  • The Tell Tale Heart – Edgar Allan Poe
  • The Dead – Charlie Higson
  • The Raven – Edgar Allan Poe
  • Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
  • Tithonus – Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Students will:

  • develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently
  • read a range of high-quality works from English literature
  • understand increasingly challenging texts through learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these
  • study a range of authors
  • write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing
  • draw on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing
  • plan, draft, edit and proof-read through considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
  • pay attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling

 

c) Spoken English competition

Students learn a poem and read to their class. Successful students will progress further through the school competition.

Students will:

  • improvise, rehearse and perform poetry using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact
  • read a range of high-quality poem, both pre-1914 and contemporary

 

4

Conflict poetry

Examining how war is represented in poetry, across a variety of different conflicts, times, and perspectives.

The poems studied are:

  • The Fourth of August – Robert Laurence Binyon
  • The Soldier – Rupert Brooke
  • Who’s For The Game – Jessie Pope
  • Exposure – Wilfred Owen
  • The Green Beret – Ho Thien
  • Dulce et Decorum Est – Wilfred Owen
  • Disabled – Wilfred Owen
  • The Sorrow of Sarajevo – Goran Simic
  • The Charge of the Light Brigade – Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • War Photographer – Carol Ann Duffy
  • Suicide in the Trenches – Siegfried Sassoon

Students will:

  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  •  know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • check their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • recognise a range of poetic conventions and understand how these have been used
  • Write poetry and other imaginative writing
  • draw on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and use these consciously in their writing to achieve particular effects
  • use Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion

Summer Term

5

Autobiography

Writing in different genres, learning how to redraft, using literary techniques in own writing and considering how sentence construction/syntax can help achieve effects.

Students will:

  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • write for a wide range of purposes and audiences
  • write notes and polished scripts for talks and presentations
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
  • draw on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing
  • plan, draft, edit and proof-read through considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
  • pay attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling
  • draw on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and use these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
  • give short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point

6

Dragon’s Den/adverts

Students analyse a variety of texts, especially with rhetoric in mind, considering how language is used to create effects and how communication has evolved.

Students work together to produce a pitch for a Dragons Den project.

Students will:

  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • write notes and polished scripts for talks and presentations
  • summarise and organise material, and support ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail
  • pay attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling; drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
  • use Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech
  • use Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
  • give short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point

 

 

Term

Content

Year 9

Autumn Term

1

Class novel

To read a whole novel in depth; reading for pleasure and information.

  • To read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning.
  • To acquire a wide vocabulary.
  • To make inferences and refer to evidence in the text.
  • To use discussion in order to learn, elaborating and explaining clearly their understanding and ideas.
  • To know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.
  • To check their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.
  • To study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these.

Possible texts:

  • A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
  • Lord of the Flies – William Golding
  • Midwinterblood – Marcus Sedgwick
  • Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
  • Stone Cold – Robert Swindells
  • The Edge – Alan Gibbons

2

Language skills – ‘Changing Hearts and Minds’

Writing for different audiences and purposes; students select and identify information, learn about connotation and inference, develop their evaluation and critical thinking skills and analyse language and structure.

Students will:

  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  •  know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • check their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

Spring Term

3 /4

Shakespeare

Macbeth

Students will:

  • develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently
  • understand increasingly challenging texts through learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • recognise a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used
  • study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these
  • understand how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play
  • speak confidently and effectively, including through using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
  • improvise, rehearse and perform play scripts in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Summer Term

5

Language skills

Practise skills needed to answer GCSE English Language paper, including Questions 3 and 4, with a particular focus on analysis and evaluation.

Students will:

  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  •  know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • check their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

6

Drama

Students read a whole drama text.

students will:

  • develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently
  • understand increasingly challenging texts through learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
  • make inferences and refer to evidence in the text
  • know the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and draw on this knowledge to support comprehension
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  • study setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these
  • understand how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play
  • speak confidently and effectively, including through using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
  •  improvise, rehearse and perform play scripts in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

 

Possible texts:

  • A View from the Bridge – Arthur Miller
  • An Inspector Calls – J.B Priestley

 

Additional Curriculum Implementation


All Year 7 classes have a library lesson each week taken by the librarian.

All Year 8 classes have a library lesson every month taken by the librarian.

In these sessions, pupils are taught to:

  • develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently through reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction, including in particular whole books, short stories, poems and plays with a wide coverage of genres, historical periods, forms and authors.
  • choose and read books independently for challenge, interest and enjoyment.

 

All Year 8 and Year 9 classes have an English ‘skills’ lesson each week, alongside the standard curriculum.

In these sessions, pupils are taught to:

  • consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through extending and applying the grammatical knowledge set out in the key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study
  • study the effectiveness and impact of the grammatical features of the texts they read
  • draw on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
  • apply their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and select the appropriate form
  • amend the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness
  • read critically through knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
  •  learn new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries


Extra Curricular Opportunities


Spoken English competition – Years 7 and 8

Students learn a poem for homework and recite to their class. Successful students progress further through the school competition. The final takes place in the hall in front of the whole of Years 7 and 8. If they are a finalist, they read out their poem and also prepare and read a short speech on a topic chosen by the faculty. The competition encourages students to be more willing to take on new challenges, improves their memory techniques, shows them how the sounds of poetry matter just as much as the language used and helps them to be more confident about speaking in public.

  Year 7 theatre trip

Year 7 students attend a local theatre production and write a play review.

Past productions:

  • 2020: The Prince and the Pauper – New Vic Theatre
  • 2019: The Wind in the Willows – New Vic Theatre
  • 2018: Treasure Island – New Vic Theatre
  • 2017: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang – The Lowry

 Year 9 Mock Trial

The Magistrates’ Court Mock Trial Competition has been running since 1994 and annually involves over 4,000 students from over 270 schools and 1,700 legal professional volunteers across over 40 magistrates’ courts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

 The Magistrates’ Court Mock Trial Competition is part of the Young Citizens ‘citizenship experiences’ and helps to improve young people’s life skills, their understanding of the justice system and the legal system, and helps them to understand that the law touches every aspect of their lives.

 What does it entail?

The students take on the various roles in a trial and try a case against another school with the assistance of real life magistrates, legal advisers, court staff and other legal professionals. The competition introduces the legal system to young people in an exciting way that has a lasting impact on all those involved, while developing student’s soft skills that will be of use throughout their lives.

 Information above from:

https://smartlaw.org.uk/mock-trials/magistrates-court-mock-trials-teachers/

Newspaper club

 Debate club

World Book Day

Every year, The Ecclesbourne School participates in World Book Day. In previous years we have done:

  • Book quizzes
  • Match the book shelf to the teacher
  • Match the favourite literary character to the teacher
  • Collect as many book titles as possible stuck around the school
  • A shared reading experience in Year 7 (in each lesson of the day, a teacher reads a section of a short story)
  •  Book review competition



Resources and Reading List

Links to helpful sites:

 

Suggested Year 7 reading list:

See link above (there are some brilliant suggestions).

  • Sophie Anderson – the House with Chicken Legs
  • David Almond – My Name is Mina
  • Sonya Hartnett – The Midnight Zoo
  • Anne Fine – Flour Babies
  • Morris Gleitzman – Once
  • Frank Cottrell – Millions
  • JRR Tolkein – The Hobbit
  • Terry Pratchett – Truckers
  • C S Lewis – The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • Lewis Carroll – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • Kenneth Grahame – The Wind in the Willows
  • J.M Barrie – Peter Pan

 

Suggested Year 8 reading list:

See link above (there are some brilliant suggestions).

  • Sally Nicholls – Things a Bright Girl Can Do
  • Candy Gourlay – Bone Talk
  • Kwame Alexander – Rebound
  • Elizabeth Acevedo – The Poet X
  • Frances Hardinge – A Skinful of Shadows
  • Sarah Crossan – One
  • Sarah Crossan – The Weight of Water
  • Sally Gardner – Maggot Moon
  • Siobhan Dowd – Bog Child
  • John Boyne – The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas
  • Malorie Blackman – Noughts and Crosses
  • Louisa May Alcott – Little Women

 

Suggested Year 9 reading list:

See link above (there are some brilliant suggestions).

  • Jason Reynolds – Long Way Down
  • Ruta Sepetys – Salt to the Sea
  • Ruta Sepetys - Between Shades of Gray
  • Tanya Landman – Buffalo Soldier
  • Kevin Brooks – The Bunker Diary
  • Nick Lake – In Darkness
  • Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice
  • Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Charlotte Bronte – Jane Eyre
  • Mary Shelley – Frankenstein
  • Charles Dickens – Great Expectations
  • Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights


Course Assessment

Grade Assessment Criteria
9 Achieved when all of the criteria mentioned below, specific to a given task, have been met.
8 Students deliberately adapt writing form to position the reader, showing a sophisticated control of purpose and effect; ambitiously select and deploy tone, style and register to enhance the purpose of the task; skilfully control overall structure achieving a range of effects; sustain critical response to texts with perceptive understanding; use interwoven quotes that are precise and pertinent; use a detailed analysis of language and comment on structure and form; employ a consistent use of relevant terminology; demonstrate a sensitive understanding of influence of contexts.
7 Students confidently adapt writing with punctuation, grammar and structure used to create deliberate effects; sustain use of tone, style and register to fulfil the purpose of the task; control overall structure with paragraphs and grammatical features used for cohesion and to create particular effects; develop convincing critical response to texts, with some insightful understanding; use well selected and integrated quotes and references; demonstrate thoughtful examination of use of language, form and structure, good use of terminology, and convincing understanding of significance of contexts.
6 Students fully control writing with tone, style and register chosen to match the task; adapt form to show clear understanding of purpose and audience; show a well-managed overall structure with paragraphs and grammatical features used to support coherence and cohesion, and sometimes for effect; detail responses to texts showing some critical style; use relevant references and quotes are used to support ideas; show some analytical comment on language, form and structure; have a competent use of terminology and clear understanding of contexts.
5 Students vary sentence types and structures and use vocabulary appropriate to purpose and effect; produce coherent, well-structured and purposeful texts; spell, punctuates and uses grammar accurately with occasional errors; make credible links and comparisons between texts; supports understanding with apt references to texts, informed by wider reading; analyse and evaluate relevant aspects of language, grammar and structure; use relevant terminology with understanding; makes relevant comments on significance of contexts.
4 Students use punctuation accurately with occasional errors in ambitious structures; employ imaginative treatment of appropriate material in a variety of forms adapted to purpose and audience; use varied range of vocabulary, often ambitious, accurately and for effect; use paragraphing to vary structure and effect; show understanding through detailed response; us some relevant textual references and quotations; demonstrate reasonable exploration of language, form and structure; show some use of critical terminology; demonstrate an awareness of significance of context.
3 Students use full range of punctuation accurately to demarcate sentences, including speech punctuation; develop relevant ideas and material with some imaginative detail; use a reasonably wide vocabulary, some of which is chosen for effect; structure material clearly with paragraphing used to support ideas and purpose; use comments to make inference and deduction based on textual evidence; clearly identify the main purpose and viewpoint of a text with some explanation; identify various features of the writer’s use of language, with some explanation; recognise significant details and implicit meaning in spoken language; shape talk in deliberate ways for clarity. Orally expressing relevant ideas and feelings, with some detail; sustains roles and responsibilities with independence in pairs or groups, sometimes shaping the direction of talk through effective contribution.
2 Students use some variety in length, structure or subject in sentences with punctuation between sentences usually used accurately; have relevant and appropriate ideas and content with some detailed development; use some expansion of vocabulary to match topic and correct spelling of common words; use paragraphing to organise ideas in a logical way; comment to make inferences based on evidence from different points in the text; show awareness of a writer’s viewpoint and makes simple comments on the overall effect on the reader; use some basic features of the writer’s use of language and structure identified with simple comment; show understanding of how and why language choices vary in their own and others’ talk in different situations; takes on straightforward roles and responsibilities in pairs or groups.
1 Students use straightforward sentence structures with full stops, capital letters and commas sometimes used accurately; attempt a style of writing that is appropriate to the task and includes appropriate ideas and content; use simple vocabulary and spells simple words correctly; attempt to organise ideas in a logical way; have straightforward understanding of a text, and make simple inferences from a single point in the text; have an ability to understand the main purpose of the text; expresses a personal response to a text; recognise and comment on different ways that meaning can be expressed in their own and others’ talk; attempt different roles and responsibilities when speaking in pairs or groups.

Contact: Mrs G. Beddow

If you have any questions or queries relating to the English curriculum please email headofenglish@ecclesbourne.derbyshire.sch.uk for more information.